Personalize your caregiver outreach when scheduling

420 words, approximately a 1.5 minute read

Prioritize your caregiver reach-out list by taking into account their relative acceptances and rejections. Save everyone's time by offering jobs to people likely to take them. One thing you can implement today: when a caregiver says no to a case, ask them why and write the reason down.

Prioritize your caregiver reach-out list by taking into account their relative acceptances and rejections. Save everyone's time by offering jobs to people likely to take them. One thing you can implement today: when a caregiver says no to a case, ask them why and write the reason down.

Does this sound familiar?

The average caregiver has over one hundred unread emails or texts every single day. How do you make you sure they answer yours? Establishing a culture of trust with your caregivers is a separate issue that can't (and shouldn't) be entirely covered in a short article, but one tactical change you can make in your agency today to increase the chances of a caregiver responding to your messages is by only sending them the clients they'd be qualified for and interested in.

“One tactical change you can make in your agency today to increase the chances of a caregiver responding to your messages is by only sending them the clients they’d be qualified for and interested in.”

A common question we get from home care owners we talk with is: how would I know what clients they'd be interested in? The easiest way to do so is by looking at the clients they've worked with in the past and connecting the dots to see what they have in common. Just like how Spotify is able to recommend songs that we'd enjoy based on our listening habits, we should constantly tailor the potential clients we send to our caregivers to maximize the chances of staffing with each conversation.




How to get started?

The first step to personalizing caregiver outreach is simply tracking acceptances and rejections as your schedulers have conversations with caregivers. The way you track doesn't matter. What matters is the behavior change. This can be the notes section of your scheduling system, an excel sheet, or even a paper notebook - it doesn't matter. After each phone call with a caregiver, write down four pieces of information:

  • Caregiver
  • Client
  • Status (accept vs. reject)
  • Reason
“The way you track doesn’t matter. What matters is the behavior change. ”

With time, you will start connecting the dots around caregivers, their preferences, and how to better personalize your offers to them. As they start receiving offers that better match their preferences, they'll start responding to your requests more often and accept offers quicker, saving your schedulers time when working to fill a shift and strengthening your relationship with your caregivers. Eventually, you can even track the effectiveness of personalizing these offers and see if the effort is leading to results or not.

Get in touch

Have you tried personalizing your outreach to caregivers vs. sending email/text blasts? What has your experience been? Let me know! Would love to hear about how things are going for you.

Newest posts

Sign up now
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Interested in learning more?

Levo Blog provides the latest insights to 10x your hiring processes

“We love working with the Levo team! They provided us with valuable advices that supercharged our hiring process.”

Gianna Johnson
Director @Arosa